Kitchener's Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-1916

Title: Kitchener’s Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-1916
Author: Peter Simkins
Goodreads Rating: 4.2
Published: November 13th 2007 by Pen & Sword Books (first published October 27th 1988)
Language: English

Numbering over five million men, Britain’s army in the First World War was the biggest in the country’s history.

Remarkably, nearly half those men who served in it were volunteers. 2,466,719 men enlisted between August 1914 and December 1915, many in response to the appeals of the Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener. How did Britain succeed in creating a mass army, almost from scratch, in the middle of a major war ? What compelled so many men to volunteer – and what happened to them once they had taken the King’s shilling ? Peter Simkins describes how Kitchener’s New Armies were raised and reviews the main political, economic and social effects of the recruiting campaign. He examines the experiences and impressions of the officers and men who made up the New Armies. As well as analyzing their motives for enlisting, he explores how they were fed, housed, equipped and trained before they set off for active service abroad.

Drawing upon a wide variety of sources, ranging from government papers to the diaries and letters of individual soldiers, he questions long-held assumptions about the ‘rush to the colors’ and the nature of patriotism in 1914. The book will be of interest not only to those studying social, political and economic history, but also to general readers who wish to know more about the story of Britain’s citizen soldiers in the Great War.

William had almost certainly waited to his nineteenth birthday to enlist.

Nineteen was the lower recruitment age for Britain’s ‘New Army’ recruits. The previous nine blogs have presented the reasons why the men of secret power wanted rid of Herbert Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War from 1914-1916 … but. Asquith’s Coalition government of May 1915 changed little in terms of Britain’s war management. It was hardly likely to given that it was a basic reshuffle of old. Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (/ h eɪ ɡ /; 19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army. 13/05/2016 · Bandsmen and the ‘Rush to the Colours’: The First Month of World War One: Convergences of Tradition, Class and Gender. By Dr Stephen Etheridge, GLCM. A page for describing UsefulNotes: World War I. Towards the end of The Edwardian Era, between 1914-1918, a war broke out between two alliances: the French- … Militaria Mart features a reputable dealer directory and resource site for collectors of militaria Here you will find over 100,000 items of militaria for sale on-line Your # 1 Source for Military Antiques & Army Surplus In Winnipeg. Now instock for our Winnipeg & walk in Customers, a selection of New & Used Army Surplus. SUCCESSORS OF ROME: FRANCIA, 447-Present. Kings and Emperors of the Franks, France, Burgundy, Italy, and Germany. Introduction. After the collapse of the Western. Winston Churchill in the Canadian Parliament, December 1941 by Yousuf Karsh. Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; In office 26 October 1951 – 6 April 1955 William had almost certainly waited to his nineteenth birthday to enlist. Nineteen was the lower recruitment age for Britain’s ‘New Army’ recruits. The previous nine blogs have presented the reasons why the men of secret power wanted rid of Herbert Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War from 1914-1916 … but. Asquith’s Coalition government of May 1915 changed little in terms of Britain’s war management. It was hardly likely to given that it was a basic reshuffle of old. Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (/ h eɪ ɡ /; 19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army. 13/05/2016 · Bandsmen and the ‘Rush to the Colours’: The First Month of World War One: Convergences of Tradition, Class and Gender. By Dr Stephen Etheridge, GLCM. A page for describing UsefulNotes: World War I. Towards the end of The Edwardian Era, between 1914-1918, a war broke out between two alliances: the French- … Militaria Mart features a reputable dealer directory and resource site for collectors of militaria Here you will find over 100,000 items of militaria for sale on-line Your # 1 Source for Military Antiques & Army Surplus In Winnipeg. Now instock for our Winnipeg & walk in Customers, a selection of New & Used Army Surplus. SUCCESSORS OF ROME: FRANCIA, 447-Present. Kings and Emperors of the Franks, France, Burgundy, Italy, and Germany. Introduction. After the collapse of the Western.

William had almost certainly waited to his nineteenth birthday to enlist. Nineteen was the lower recruitment age for Britain’s ‘New Army’ recruits. The previous nine blogs have presented the reasons why the men of secret power wanted rid of Herbert Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War from 1914-1916 … but. Asquith’s Coalition government of May 1915 changed little in terms of Britain’s war management. It was hardly likely to given that it was a basic reshuffle of old. Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (/ h eɪ ɡ /; 19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army.

13/05/2016 · Bandsmen and the ‘Rush to the Colours’: The First Month of World War One: Convergences of Tradition, Class and Gender.

By Dr Stephen Etheridge, GLCM. A page for describing UsefulNotes: World War I. Towards the end of The Edwardian Era, between 1914-1918, a war broke out between two alliances: the French- … Militaria Mart features a reputable dealer directory and resource site for collectors of militaria Here you will find over 100,000 items of militaria for sale on-line Your # 1 Source for Military Antiques & Army Surplus In Winnipeg. Now instock for our Winnipeg & walk in Customers, a selection of New & Used Army Surplus. SUCCESSORS OF ROME: FRANCIA, 447-Present. Kings and Emperors of the Franks, France, Burgundy, Italy, and Germany. Introduction. After the collapse of the Western. William had almost certainly waited to his nineteenth birthday to enlist. Nineteen was the lower recruitment age for Britain’s ‘New Army’ recruits. The previous nine blogs have presented the reasons why the men of secret power wanted rid of Herbert Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War from 1914-1916 … but. Asquith’s Coalition government of May 1915 changed little in terms of Britain’s war management. It was hardly likely to given that it was a basic reshuffle of old. Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (/ h eɪ ɡ /; 19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army.

13/05/2016 · Bandsmen and the ‘Rush to the Colours’: The First Month of World War One: Convergences of Tradition, Class and Gender. By Dr Stephen Etheridge, GLCM. A page for describing UsefulNotes: World War I. Towards the end of The Edwardian Era, between 1914-1918, a war broke out between two alliances: the French- … Militaria Mart features a reputable dealer directory and resource site for collectors of militaria Here you will find over 100,000 items of militaria for sale on-line Your # 1 Source for Military Antiques & Army Surplus In Winnipeg. Now instock for our Winnipeg & walk in Customers, a selection of New & Used Army Surplus. SUCCESSORS OF ROME: FRANCIA, 447-Present. Kings and Emperors of the Franks, France, Burgundy, Italy, and Germany. Introduction. After the collapse of the Western.

Kitchener’s Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-1916

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